Beer Experiments - Brulosophy

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Beer Experiments - Brulosophy

Postby BigYin » Sun Apr 29, 2018 12:44

A brewing mate at work introduced me to this :

http://brulosophy.com/projects/exbeeriments/

It's fascinating - idea seems to be to take almost any aspect of brewing, then take that one variable and do two brews identical in every aspect except that one variable, then take those results and get a bunch of folks to do a blind taste test to see if there's any actual difference.

It challenges a lot of the 'accepted wisdom' in a logical way.

The one that really drew my attention is this one on Mash temperatures and the effect on final gravity - http://brulosophy.com/2015/10/12/the-mash-high-vs-low-temperature-exbeeriment-results/

The lower mash temp finished at 1.005 – 9 points lower than the high temp mash (1.014) :o

The temps used are in Fahrenheit : 147f = 63.9c / 171f = 71.7c

I’m really interested in this as my mash temps tend to be in the 66c to 68c area and the beers often finish short of the target FG….

So I’m going to aim for 63c mash temp for the next brew :drink:

It's also interesting that you could use this info to lower the ABV in a brew - maybe to get a session beer :cheers:
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Re: Beer Experiments - Brulosophy

Postby rats_eyes » Sun Apr 29, 2018 13:44

Brulosophy is a great project. Full of interesting things without being stuffy. They also have a podcast which is just as great, well worth a listen.
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Re: Beer Experiments - Brulosophy

Postby Cheebs » Sun Apr 29, 2018 16:30

I enjoy brulosophy also. There isn't a huge amount of scientific rigor, but they openly admit that. At the beginning of the year I brewed two "identical" beers on consecutive days, with different water. I was certain I could tell the beers apart before don't a triangle test myself and was fascinated to find out that I couldn't. See my "tale of two teas" brewlog. I'll definitely be doing more
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Re: Beer Experiments - Brulosophy

Postby HTH1975 » Wed May 02, 2018 12:28

BigYin wrote:It's also interesting that you could use this info to lower the ABV in a brew - maybe to get a session beer :cheers:


You could, but mashing at a higher temperature to get a less fermentable wort means you have more residual sugar and therefore a sweeter beer with more body - none of which you’re going to want in a session beer imo.

Better off brewing it to a lower ABV using less malt imo.

2016: 330L brewed (72 gallons, over 8 firkins)
2017: 105L brewed (need to update this figure)
Drinking: Landlord clone
Conditioning: ciders from 2016, hedgerow barrolo, 1914 Courage RIS (10%).
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Re: Beer Experiments - Brulosophy

Postby robwalker » Wed May 02, 2018 13:42

It's good, but not gospel - just one experiment. Marshall would probably tell you the same thing, it's hard to undo years of research with a couple of home brews, but he is pretty good at mythbusting. One that particularly interested me was cold sparging, with little discernable difference in the finished beer - not best practice, but definitely something you wouldn't dream of otherwise.

Mash temp is a fairly massive variable, with us-05 my beers mashed at 65 go to 80% attenuation, those mashed at 70 get to about 72%. Changes the finished beer massively
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Re: Beer Experiments - Brulosophy

Postby jaroporter » Fri May 04, 2018 21:14

HTH1975 wrote:
BigYin wrote:It's also interesting that you could use this info to lower the ABV in a brew - maybe to get a session beer :cheers:


You could, but mashing at a higher temperature to get a less fermentable wort means you have more residual sugar and therefore a sweeter beer with more body - none of which you’re going to want in a session beer imo.

Better off brewing it to a lower ABV using less malt imo.


thing here is that to go for a low ABV you can end up with a thin and watery beer. brewing with a higher mash temperature to leave a more normal final gravity can counteract this.
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Re: Beer Experiments - Brulosophy

Postby HTH1975 » Sat May 05, 2018 09:11

jaroporter wrote:
HTH1975 wrote:
BigYin wrote:It's also interesting that you could use this info to lower the ABV in a brew - maybe to get a session beer :cheers:


You could, but mashing at a higher temperature to get a less fermentable wort means you have more residual sugar and therefore a sweeter beer with more body - none of which you’re going to want in a session beer imo.

Better off brewing it to a lower ABV using less malt imo.


thing here is that to go for a low ABV you can end up with a thin and watery beer. brewing with a higher mash temperature to leave a more normal final gravity can counteract this.


It’s a balancing act for sure - that’s why there is an element of art/craft in brewing, along with science.

A thicker mash will also give more mouthfeel.

2016: 330L brewed (72 gallons, over 8 firkins)
2017: 105L brewed (need to update this figure)
Drinking: Landlord clone
Conditioning: ciders from 2016, hedgerow barrolo, 1914 Courage RIS (10%).
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Re: Beer Experiments - Brulosophy

Postby Kev888 » Thu May 24, 2018 21:27

Brulosophy is interesting and often worth a read, much better than a lot of stuff around. Though as a small note of caution don't automatically read 'too' much into their findings; they carry out small tests rather than comprehensive experiments (and not always without flaws). So things may not translate to other circumstances.

They do say things like this themselves, so I'm not putting them down, but it is frequently overlooked. Its worth being especially cautious in interpreting the results when they don't manage to find an effect; it is extremely easy to not find things, but it doesn't necessarily follow that they aren't there to find.

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