Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

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Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby Good Ed » Sun Apr 13, 2014 00:38

Published in 2010 it has become the standard for those wishing to learn more about yeasts and understanding the very important influence that yeast has on beer. The book covers the history of yeast, brewing practices and how yeasts work, propagating and culturing yeasts, setting up a lab :ugeek: and a troubleshooting guide. An invaluable reference book.

Here's to the man who drinks strong ale,
and goes to bed quite mellow.
Lives as he ought to live,
and dies a jolly good fellow.
- Old English folk song
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby Dennis King » Sun Apr 13, 2014 00:52

I have to admit some areas I had to read a few times to understand but don't let that put you off, that is just me. Still not completed the yeast lab section but what I have read in general has increased my knowledge of our magic ingredient.
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby Midnight Brew » Sun Apr 13, 2014 06:39

A fantastic book covering all things yeast. One big thing I learnt from this book is aeration. Now all my brews have been getting aerated correctly, I have been hitting all my attenuation figures and fermentation has performed better. Also been playing around with freezing strains to keep on hand.
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby TidalPete » Mon Apr 28, 2014 07:04

+1

An invaluable part of any brewer's kit.

The hardest part of "Yeast" for me was wading through the technical stuff in the first two chapters. :)

'Twas TidalPete from UpTheCoast who caught the all-grain craze,
He turned aside the staid XXXX that served him many days.

With apologies to A. B. (Banjo) Paterson.
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby Bribie G » Thu May 01, 2014 00:04

This would be the book that really lifted my game. I feel that White (who is in the business of selling liquid yeasts) could have done a better section on dried yeasts, but his explanation of why you need to rehydrate dried yeast should be carved in stone and all new brewers should be bashed around the head with it :twisted:

Brilliant book, these guys really know what they are talking about. I've also bought the hops book in the series.
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby Hawks » Thu May 01, 2014 07:28

Bribie G wrote:This would be the book that really lifted my game. I feel that White (who is in the business of selling liquid yeasts) could have done a better section on dried yeasts, but his explanation of why you need to rehydrate dried yeast should be carved in stone and all new brewers should be bashed around the head with it :twisted:


Nicely put :rofl:

Great book though, takes some reading but I often refer back to it.. :thumb:
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby Springer » Thu May 01, 2014 08:40

Yes, its on my bookshelf and totally agree with all up post. :D
S

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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby GrahamT » Thu May 01, 2014 09:52

Yep. A bit of a head-hurter in the bio-chem 'Science bit' early on (not a criticism), but the next few sections are more practical and very insightful. I've got to admit..

a) I haven't finished it yet :oops: I plan to read more when I bother to start harvesting yeast, and
b) I was following nearly all the good practices given that would affect my small set up anyway, just from reading so much on Another Place and elsewhere. It hasn't really changed what I do for the moment, though it has confirmed a few things. In that sense, I guess it wasn't indispensable.

A very detailed read and I guess most brewers will come away feeling better equipped and as though they've cut through a few myths. We really need an independent second book (or a degree in bio-chemistry) to hold it up against something else, but I'm happy to trust it!

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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby graysalchemy » Thu May 01, 2014 09:54

It is a great book something everyone should read at least once (but probably more to undersatand it :D )

:thumb:

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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby tommidolcetto » Thu May 01, 2014 10:01

Agree with above (all of 'em), a bit of a heavy read but very interesting.

Have found that I've reverted to using dried yeasts (re-hydrated of course!) as don't really have time, equipment, patience etc to get involved with starters, harvesting, splitting, growing and also due to the choice now available dried.

Am really looking forward to the malts book in the series being published later this year.
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby djcorbetto » Sat Jul 19, 2014 21:15

Ive bought three books out of the series: hops, yeast and water. Just started reading the yeast one and it's full of great information, but I can only imagine that my first read just went over my head, cell structures etc, I haven't studded those since school. good book though and no doubt the other two will be good too.
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby Aleman » Sat Jul 19, 2014 21:27

Yeast is by far the best of them

please note:The use of punctuation, bold, underlining, italics, and different sized type, follows the convention used in writing, for many years, to place emphasis on the point being made, and to highlight the importance of that point in the opinion of the author. It is not the intention of the author to shout, if that was the case the author would adopt the, much more recent, convention of using all capital letters.
Albert Einstein wrote:Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby djcorbetto » Sat Jul 19, 2014 21:46

is there much to the others?
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby Good Ed » Sat Jul 19, 2014 22:11

djcorbetto wrote:is there much to the others?


this is Hops, I haven't got Water yet and Grains comes out later this year.

Here's to the man who drinks strong ale,
and goes to bed quite mellow.
Lives as he ought to live,
and dies a jolly good fellow.
- Old English folk song
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby wigwamheed » Sun Jul 20, 2014 08:08

It made me spend even more money, what with the stir plate and brew fridge I had to build immediately after finishing it. Just need to convince the Mrs that we need a lab now ;)
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby aamcle » Sun Jul 20, 2014 10:04

Is there any information in it about fermentations using a stepped temperature profile?

I've found a site about German beers/lagers with some information but that's about all, I'd like an authoritative source.


Atb. Aamcle
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby wigwamheed » Sun Jul 20, 2014 10:46

There's some info about changing the fermenting temp at different points, I presume you're on about that rather than stepped mashing?
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby aamcle » Sun Jul 20, 2014 11:11

That's right, after reading

"Tasty's" procedure - http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=21424&start=1


I'd like to know more about temperature profiling during fermentation.


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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby Aleman » Sun Jul 20, 2014 11:36

There are some yeasts that benefit from it (Saisons spring to mind), but having read the procedure and for the couple of style mentioned (APA and A Dortmunder using 833) got to say Wha :scratch:

You are not wanting to drive attenuation by changing the fermentation temperature, as that is mostly fixed in mashing, all you would really achieve is just making sure that the yeast don't poop out and leave some unfermentables in there. . . Frankly if you pitch enough healthy yeast then that is not going to happen . . IF the yeast strain is known to produce diacetyl then you may well want to raise the temperature for the last 2 days of fermentation . . . and that would have the effect of 'forcing' attenuation to completion.

Personally for my pilsners I pitch big at fermentation temperature (Usually around 8-9C), have a good krausen within 24 Hours, and it has generally finished (fully attenuated) after 12 days . . . and after crash chilling and force carbonating I could probably drink it, IMO I am making a quality product which does not . . . and should not . . . be rushed . . . I notice the 'commercial craft brewer' was not named . . . and remember these commercial guys are pitching very big (especially the lagers), so have controlled ester formation from the start (when it's cold) . . . once its warm, the dangers of ester formation and fusel formation is significantly reduced . . . unless you are pitching lots of yeast stay well clear.

please note:The use of punctuation, bold, underlining, italics, and different sized type, follows the convention used in writing, for many years, to place emphasis on the point being made, and to highlight the importance of that point in the opinion of the author. It is not the intention of the author to shout, if that was the case the author would adopt the, much more recent, convention of using all capital letters.
Albert Einstein wrote:Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby aamcle » Sun Jul 20, 2014 12:28

So no need to mess about just pitch big! that's good. If there isn't enough yeast I'll grow up more, I will lager after its finished -1°C for 1day per week(?). In reality once its out of the fridge and into the freezer I'm happy for it to stay there for a week or two.

I'm not desperate to get it finished but some of the things I've read about lager fermentations, well 7 weeks fermenting....... Not good!

This particular AG kit comes with 23g of Brewferm dried Pilsner yeast, expiry dated about this time next year, would that be enough? Mr Malty seems to think so but does that count as "Big" or just enough?


Many Thanks. Aamcle

Last edited by aamcle on Sun Jul 20, 2014 12:34, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby Aleman » Sun Jul 20, 2014 12:31

When pitching with dried lager yeasts I normally go for 2.5 to 3 times the ale pitching rate so 23g is on the button.

7 Weeks fermenting :shock: . . . . Just didn't pitch enough yeast

Edit: The Czech Rule of Thumb is
1 hour of mashing for every degree Plato (Triple Decocted!!)
1 Day Fermenting for every degree Plato
1 Weeks Lagering for every degree Plato

1 Degree Plato is about 4 Gravity points so a 10 Plato beer is 1.040 a 12 Plato beer is 1048 etc

please note:The use of punctuation, bold, underlining, italics, and different sized type, follows the convention used in writing, for many years, to place emphasis on the point being made, and to highlight the importance of that point in the opinion of the author. It is not the intention of the author to shout, if that was the case the author would adopt the, much more recent, convention of using all capital letters.
Albert Einstein wrote:Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby aamcle » Sun Jul 20, 2014 13:37

Thanks for that, I'll brew this week :)


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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby djcorbetto » Sun Jul 20, 2014 17:38

I can imagine that pitching big can be done in a flask and just culture yeast till it's enough to pitch
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Re: Yeast by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff

Postby Rolfster » Mon Aug 11, 2014 18:03

Just got this and am looking forward to reading it. Even the bits that make peoples heads hurt!
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