Page 1 of 1

Scarborough - 2807503 - Water Company Report

PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2014 21:01
by Aleman
As Requested By Graham

Re: Scarborough - 2807503 - Water Company Report

PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2014 21:27
by GrahamT
All figures except Alkalinity are mean averages of tests from Yorkshire Water report for "Scarborough 2004 (2807503) Water Supply Zone" for Reporting Period 1.1.13 to 31.12.13

Calcium
63 mg/l

Magnesium
6 mg/l

Sodium
21 mg/l

Potassium
Not available (even on request)

Sulphate
43 mg/l

Chloride
31 mg/l

Alkalinity
As measured by myself with Salifert kit on 9.11.14
1.25 meq/l (62.5ppm as CaCO3)

I will be looking for the best way to reduce that alkalinity a bit for my next pale, while keeping the other components in good order. Any advice very welcome!

Re: Scarborough - 2807503 - Water Company Report

PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2014 22:52
by Eric
The amount of alkalinity, which is likely the only reliable measurement, doesn't fit with the water company's figures, a reasonable balance would need twice as much.

A full water analysis would be necessary to be sure, but you might make assumption that as the alkalinity was half what would fit the water company figures, then using half the company's values would fit your measured alkalinity. That being the case, that water contains rather little natural salts and will be in need of more in additions.

With relatively little alkalinity reduction necessary, any commonly used acid will be suitable. CRS is available from most homebrew shops.

Re: Scarborough - 2807503 - Water Company Report

PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2014 00:14
by GrahamT
Than you very much Eric. I've never treated my water before other than a Campden tablet, but I had hoped that I would get away with CRS. I have pumped all this into a calculator elsewhere and have an idea what else to add.

I tested my Salifert kit (and my use of it) with the test solution supplied today and it hit the expected figure absolutely spot on. I hadn't read the table to see what quantity would theoretically be left in the 1ml syringe beforehand, so went in suitably blind too. I'm impressed with the kit. I did a test when I got the kit a few days ago (twice) and the CaCO3 came out at 102.5, which seems quite a fluctuation, though I'm pretty confident in my testing, as far as it goes. That would get it some way closer to the levels you point out the water company figures would suggest. FWIW, the Max/Min figures given for Calcium have a 30mg/l range in the reporting period, over 8 samples.

Yorks Water were quick to point out on the phone and in writing that the supply can change considerably at any time, so I'm certainly going to take a reading for alkalinity on brew days from now on. I may apply the CRS and bring other salts in progressively over a few brews.

By the way, if I treat with CRS, gypsum and other salts as required, should I still add a Campden tablet? Probably showing my ignorance there. :roll:

Re: Scarborough - 2807503 - Water Company Report

PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2014 00:31
by GrowlingDog
Always add a Campden Tablet. That removes the chlorine and chloramines.

Re: Scarborough - 2807503 - Water Company Report

PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2014 00:36
by GrahamT
GrowlingDogBeer wrote:Always add a Campden Tablet. That removes the chlorine and chloramines.


Cheers, will do then. :thumb:

Re: Scarborough - 2807503 - Water Company Report

PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2014 11:49
by Eric
Yes, as was well advised, add some campden or sod. met. to your water at the start, give it a good stir and record that fact with all others in a hard backed book. If you forget that addition at some stage in the future you will in a position to decide if it was necessary.

Alkalinity at 102ppm is much more in line with those water companies figures, but from your findings you might presently consider that your water's mineral content will, with the exception of making Pilsner types, require supplementing to ensure adequate calcium at each stage of the process. Using CRS when making more flavoured pale beers than Pilsner will still allow either sulphate or chloride to dominate, but the range will be somewhat limited in comparison with what can be achieved with other acids.

After you have treated the alkalinity in your liquor with adequate agitation and enough time for the reactions, do another Salifert test. While G.W. will cringe if he reads this, it will at least confirm your initial readings and calculated acid requirements. There are more accurate ways of measuring alkalinity than using a Salifert kit, however they are accurate enough to get alkalinity in the right region for brewing beers.

Good luck.