PH Meter

Postby serum » Mon Jan 05, 2015 22:42

Hi all

I want to start thinking about treating my water properly and measuring PH to help improve my brews. Do any of you use a meter for this and, if so, which one?

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Re: PH Meter

Postby GrahamT » Mon Jan 05, 2015 22:52

I've got a cheapo £7 ebay job, but to be honest, I didn't even bother sticking it in the mash this weekend. In the absence of a very expensive and reliable instrument, I'd prefer to trust a Salifert alkalinity test on brewday combined with my grain bill in an online calculator for treatment to get the pH in the right zone, for now, which I did for the first time.

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Re: PH Meter

Postby mark1964 » Tue Jan 06, 2015 06:47

+1 for the salifert kits :thumb:

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Re: PH Meter

Postby fishplate » Tue Jan 06, 2015 09:46

Which kit do I need to get, want to start trying to sort my water out
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Re: PH Meter

Postby rpt » Tue Jan 06, 2015 20:04

I think most of us use the alkalinity test kit. We get all the other figures from our water supplier.

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Re: PH Meter

Postby Mark » Tue Jan 06, 2015 20:10

one of these mate;

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Salifert-KH-A ... 335a04fc1e

You may be able to get other info from water report (get you in the ball park, but unlikely to be too accurate) which you can plug in to a water calc if you have your alkalinity too. From memory, you can enter calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulfate and chloride. There is a recommendation i've seen on here for somewhere you can send a sample of your water to, which will then give you all the info you need accurately for £25.

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Re: PH Meter

Postby mark1964 » Wed Jan 07, 2015 07:20

that's the right kit. Potassium isn't included in my water report. Been thinking about sending for a £25 test :thumb:

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Re: PH Meter

Postby jkp » Wed Jan 07, 2015 08:32

There must be someone who can recommend a ph meter!

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Re: PH Meter

Postby krazypara3165 » Wed Jan 07, 2015 08:54

jkp wrote:There must be someone who can recommend a ph meter!


my experience with PH testers (from an aquarium POV) is that the cheaper ones <£50 are widly inaccurate. as everyone has stated the best bet is a salifert test kit.

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Re: PH Meter

Postby Aleman » Wed Jan 07, 2015 11:35

I use the Oakton pH5 and can certainly recommend it. It is a lab grade instrument and needs to be treated as such. . . You also need to replace the probes on a regular process and they vary between 67 and 135 quid!

Several homebrewers I know are using this little Voltcraft PH 100 Meter with some success. at only 35 quid (and sometime on offer at 29!!) it's a good deal, and the probes are a reasonable price as well, although at 35 quid you could always buy another meter.

Just remember that the pH value of your water is completely irrelevant to brewing. You can use it to measure the pH of the mash after 10 minutes to determine if your water treatment has got you in the right ball park (5.2 to 5.5) . .or even if the calculator that you are using to determine your treatment is actually useful :whistle:

please note:The use of punctuation, bold, underlining, italics, and different sized type, follows the convention used in writing, for many years, to place emphasis on the point being made, and to highlight the importance of that point in the opinion of the author. It is not the intention of the author to shout, if that was the case the author would adopt the, much more recent, convention of using all capital letters.
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Re: PH Meter

Postby paulg » Wed Jan 07, 2015 15:18

+1 for the voltcraft one.
I assume it works ok,I am getting mash ph very close to predicted value in bru n water and definitely an improvement in the beer since starting to treat my water.
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Re: PH Meter

Postby GrahamT » Wed Jan 07, 2015 16:46

Aleman wrote:I use the Oakton pH5 and can certainly recommend it. It is a lab grade instrument and needs to be treated as such. . . You also need to replace the probes on a regular process and they vary between 67 and 135 quid!

Several homebrewers I know are using this little Voltcraft PH 100 Meter with some success. at only 35 quid (and sometime on offer at 29!!) it's a good deal, and the probes are a reasonable price as well, although at 35 quid you could always buy another meter.

Just remember that the pH value of your water is completely irrelevant to brewing. You can use it to measure the pH of the mash after 10 minutes to determine if your water treatment has got you in the right ball park (5.2 to 5.5) . .or even if the calculator that you are using to determine your treatment is actually useful :whistle:


Maybe someone with a lab grade pH meter and a decent water analysis would be kind enough to test the success of an online treatment calculator or two for us. :whistle: :whistle: :whistle:

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Re: PH Meter

Postby Aleman » Wed Jan 07, 2015 17:41

He would, but as he doesn't use a calculator that does that it's not possible.

Sorry.

What you have to remember is that I am not an adherent of the one ideal water profile for a beer style, or that the residual alkalinity work of kola check is applicable to all water types and beer styles ;)

please note:The use of punctuation, bold, underlining, italics, and different sized type, follows the convention used in writing, for many years, to place emphasis on the point being made, and to highlight the importance of that point in the opinion of the author. It is not the intention of the author to shout, if that was the case the author would adopt the, much more recent, convention of using all capital letters.
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Re: PH Meter

Postby GrahamT » Wed Jan 07, 2015 18:35

Aleman wrote:He would, but as he doesn't use a calculator that does that it's not possible.

Sorry.

What you have to remember is that I am not an adherent of the one ideal water profile for a beer style, or that the residual alkalinity work of kola check is applicable to all water types and beer styles ;)


Fair enough! :D

FWIW, I only meant the mash pH aspect, not any adherence to a whole profile for a given style. If anyone with the £35 job upwards (and accurate water profile) could say that the mash pH was usually well within limits when they followed even just a calculated CRS addition for example, for a certain grain bill, then it would be interesting to see if the calculator was pretty close. By no means perfect or repeatable, but certainly interesting.

I wonder if any of the calculator authors have published real results on mash pH: will have a look!

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Re: PH Meter

Postby Aleman » Wed Jan 07, 2015 19:18

The issue with getting an accurate pH with CRS is it actually being the strength they quote! Some testing has show that it may be more than twice as strong as it's quoted! !

please note:The use of punctuation, bold, underlining, italics, and different sized type, follows the convention used in writing, for many years, to place emphasis on the point being made, and to highlight the importance of that point in the opinion of the author. It is not the intention of the author to shout, if that was the case the author would adopt the, much more recent, convention of using all capital letters.
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Re: PH Meter

Postby paulg » Wed Jan 07, 2015 19:26

As stated in my post above I have a voltcraft ph meter and treat my water with phosphoric acid (cant find food grade sulphuric or hydrochloric acid here,although I havent look too hard)
.I use bru n water to calculate my addition of acid and find that yes in general the prediction falls with in +/- 0.05 of the measured reading.
now the recommendations of salt levels in the bru n water are different to our british recommendations ???
I know it is only a cheap meter and would be interested if a lab grade one confirms this.
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Re: PH Meter

Postby xCamel xSlayer » Mon Jan 30, 2017 13:53

From reading this thread, I'm guessing it's not entirely worth me buying a pH meter, and just sticking with the Salifert kit yes?
Do you all take a sample from your mash in this case, to check you are on target?
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Re: PH Meter

Postby Pakman » Mon Jan 30, 2017 14:43

I use paper pH strips obtained from RS Components. Not too expensive for a pack of 100 and I've been using mine for years now - still haven't run out.
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